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Programme

26 March

Session

11:30 – 13:00

Registration: welcome coffee and village moment

13:00 – 13:50

Opening ceremony

Speech and appeal by Her Royal Highness The Grand Duchess of Luxembourg, followed by survivor testimony.

Video message from Christine Lagarde, Managing Director, International Monetary Fund.

13:50 – 14:20

The geopolitics of sexual violence in fragile environments

[Plenary]

14:20 – 15:00

Keynote followed by journalist Q&A

[Keynote]

Dr. Denis Mukwege, Founder and Medical Director, Panzi Hospital

15:00 – 15:20

Break

15:20 – 16:20

Healing the body

[Workshop]

Victims of sexual violence often require long-term treatments following urgent medical help. Yet, many obstacles can impede access to care. It can also be difficult for health workers to identify victims who need treatment if they don’t come forward themselves.

  • How can we encourage more survivors to seek medical care, or otherwise identify victims in need of help?
  • How can we address the threat of stigmatisation which prevents many from seeking medical services?
  • What are some examples of models of care and best practices that help both health workers and victims overcome obstacles at each step of the care process?

15:20 – 16:20

Healing the mind

[Workshop]

Beyond physical injuries, sexual violence is a source of deep psychological trauma. Survivors often need support in order to overcome the trauma and heal their mental wounds. Yet even the most basic psychological support can be lacking in fragile environments.

  • What are some of the programmes which are already in place to treat the psychological effects of sexual violence? What does this show us about the main gaps in treatment?
  • What are some models for best practice to treat psychological trauma?
  • What is our state of knowledge about using these models in different local contexts and cultures? Do we have good examples of care-givers effectively adapting psychological trauma treatments?
  • How to manage treatment for both psychological and physical trauma in fragile environments?

15:20 – 16:20

Shunning the victims

[Workshop]

Stigmas and taboos are at the heart of the tragedy of sexual violence, and significantly exacerbate all of its impacts. Stigma leads to the social rejection of victims and their being left isolated and abandoned. It impedes survivors getting access to essential services, and it destroys families and communities. How can we avoid survivors being blamed for being the victims of violence?

  • What are the commonalities and the key differences in stigmatisation in different regions?
  • What can we learn from existing anti-stigmatisation programmes for effective interventions, and replicating these in different geographies?
  • What about community interventions: are there communications tools which could reduce the community rejection of survivors? What of community and faith leaders - how can they be engaged to fight against stigmatisation and help welcome victims back into their communities?

15:20 – 16:20

Born rejected and stateless: fostering inclusion for the children of war rape

[Workshop]

The damage sexual violence produces can transcend generations. Children born of rape may be blamed as ‘offspring of the enemy and rejected or abandoned as a consequence. For many, stigmatisation is made worse by statelessness, further impeding these children’s access to health, school, and work throughout their lives.

  • What are the key priorities to address the needs of children born of rape? What kind of support do they need most?
  • What can we learn for other contexts from programmes which have helped these children integrate into society?
  • What legal and administrative practices must be changed in order to prevent these children from being excluded?

16:30 – 17:30

Collaborating for scale

[Plenary]

Including conclusions from the day’s sessions.

20:00 – Close

Celebration of the victory of survivors

Gala evening at the Philharmonie, featuring the Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra.

27 March

Session

08:00 – 09:00

Registration: welcome coffee

09:00 – 09:10

Trailer of ‘Woman’ by Yann Arthus Bertrand and Anastasia Mikova

09:20 – 09:50

The socio-economic impacts of sexual violence in fragile environments

[Plenary]

09:50 – 10:20

Keynote followed by audience Q&A

[Keynote]

Muhammad Yunus, Founder, Grameen Bank; Nobel Peace Prize laureate 2006

10:20 – 10:50

Break

10:50 – 11:35

Keynote followed by audience Q&A

[Keynote]

Céline Bardet, Founder, We are NOT Weapons of War

Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor, International Criminal Court

11:35 – 11:45

Transition

11:45 – 12:45

Uniting systems for justice

[Workshop]

National and international tribunals must reinforce each other to increase the prospects of accountability for sexual violence in fragile environments. While international courts play an important role in setting legal precedents, only local courts can apply them more systematically. ‘Traditional’ justice mechanisms also have a role to play for accountability.

  • How can we enhance the judicial response at all of these levels? How can international tribunals step up the prosecution of emblematic cases of sexual violence, and how can local actors be better equipped to apply the law more effectively?
  • Should we concentrate on the development of new legal instruments (e.g. the Murad Code), or should we focus resources on the implementation of existing norms?
  • What are the roles of ‘traditional justice’ or ‘community-based dispute resolution’ mechanisms?
  • How can we ensure that the interests of victims are placed at the centre of all these approaches?

11:45 – 12:45

Innovative funding for impact

[Workshop]

Effective solutions require a diverse and sustainable flow of resources, especially financial resources. Lack of funding often prevents promising projects from being developed, or restricts their scope and scaling, undercutting the assistance given to survivors.

  • What are some innovative forms of program funding, and how can they be applied to sexual violence reduction initiatives? How can new initiatives be designed to attract sustainable support?
  • What can be learned from other innovation success stories, like the Humanitarian Impact Bond, for creating sustainable funding?
  • How to ensure financing for reparations for sexual violence, whether for conventional funds (e.g. the ICC Trust Fund) or alternative and innovative ones (e.g. the MF’s International Reparations Initiative)?

11:45 – 12:45

Nothing about us without us

[Workshop]

Survivors must be at the centre of the response to sexual violence in fragile environments. Too often, their voices are not heard and their priorities are not taken into account by decision-makers.

  • How can survivors already acting together and raising their voices? How can this be reinforced as a path to healing?
  • How can we ensure that survivors are heard by national and international decision-makers, and that they have the opportunity to influence the policies and programmes that affect them?
  • Survivors’ are not one single voice. How can we navigate potential divergence of opinions within the ‘survivor community’ and survivor movements?

11:45 – 12:45

Technology is part of the solution

[Workshop]

Technology has great potential to enhance our response to sexual violence in fragile environments. Technological innovations such as mobile applications, protected databases, and data-analysis software can help protect survivors and support more effective provision of services. From creating alerts to recording evidence to helping survivors to self-organise, technological innovations can improve our responses to sexual violence in varied and far-reaching ways.

  • Where does technology have the greatest potential to support our response to sexual violence in fragile environments?
  • What innovative technologies are already available, and how can they be improved and made widely available?
  • Where should we focus for developing new technologies? What are the risks involved and how can we address them?

11:45 – 12:45

From pain to power

[Workshop]

Basic survival is often the first priority for victims of sexual violence, who may find every aspect of their daily lives disrupted especially when they are rejected by their families and excluded from their villages and communities. Solutions for survivors must include addressing their basic needs and economic insecurities.

  • How can we assist victims to remain active members of their communities?
  • What is the potential for training and coaching, micro-finance, village savings and loans associations, and other programmes to turn suffering into a creative force (and victims into family/community leaders)?

12:45 – 14:45

Lunch and village moment

14:45 – 15:45

Uniting for impact

[Plenary]

Including conclusions from the day’s sessions.

15:45 – 16:30

Closing ceremony

Calls for donations and signatures. Appeal of Her Royal Highness The Grand Duchess and launch of the ‘alliance’, followed by a song of survivors.